Students at a small elementary school in the UK got a special treat when Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall read a poem live on the school’s radio station while visiting the school Thursday.

The 71-year-old, who has long campaigned to increase reading and literacy, read lines out of Roald Dahl’s “Television,” which satirizes the impact of the screen on kids, at White Rose Primary School in New Tredegar, South Wales.

She recited:

“THEY … USED … TO … READ! They’d READ and READ,
AND READ and READ, and then proceed
To READ some more. Great Scott! Gadzooks!
One half their lives was reading books!
The nursery shelves held books galore!”

Camilla was accompanied to the school by husband Prince Charles, 70.

The couple’s visit was part of their annual Wales Week, which they spend traveling the nation and visiting many local charities and organizations.

After the reading at the school, the Duchess handed the children a small selection of books for their library and thanked them for reading aloud other parts of Dahl’s poem.

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“It’s a pretty good poem. I’m glad you are all very keen readers,” she said. “You will have to keep away from that television screen!”

The Duchess asked some of the children what they had been reading — and the answers included J.K. Rowling, the Narnia chronicles and David Walliams.

“Oh, all my grandchildren read [Walliams]. Have you read his latest book? They have all been gripped by it,” she said.

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Upstairs, Prince Charles was saluting the school’s students for their physical fitness: The 280-children school recently received an award from the Welsh Network of Healthy School Schemes for reaching the highest standards in promoting health among children and staff.

In a classroom, Prince Charles was shown how students make smoothies — Charles chose a mixture of strawberries, blueberries and bananas — using a blender powered by a bicycle, and he also made a very tall sandwich comprised of healthy ingredients.

Prince Charles also learned the Welsh language words for cucumber, tomato and melon.

On their way into the school, Camilla and Charles walked through a line of locals and young schoolchildren. Charles tickled Aidan Wallace, six months, under the chin with a soft toy dragon the prince had just been given.

“Are you going to give me a smile?” Charles asked — and unlike yesterday, it seemed to work.

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“He did give him a little smile,” the child’s mom, 31-year-old Rozanna Anderson, said.

At the end of their visit, the couple listened to the school’s nine- and 10-year-olds show off their singing talents under the tutelage of the Aloud charity, which inspires kids to improve their lives through singing.

“You will remember this for the rest of your lives,” Tim Rhys-Evans, from the Aloud charity, told them. “And please remember, it was singing together that made this happen.”

Earlier, the couple had visited The Winding House museum, where they saw a fully restored Victorian winding engine that used to power the elevators taking workers down into the nearby coal mines. They also met former minors as well as local artists.

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