Katy Perry is over small talk.

The pop star, 34, dropped her newest single on Thursday night with a lyric video for the track, titled “Small Talk,” which is all about the awkward distance that happens between ex-lovers after a breakup.

Perry wrote the song with Jacob Kasher Hindlin, Johan Carlsson and Charlie Puth, with the latter two producing, and Peter Karlsson producing the vocals. 

Perry teased the song earlier in the week with a sequence of photos shared on Instagram that included snippets of the song.

The Instagram posts included notes “from the desk of Katy Perry,” that featured lyrics from the song, her second single of 2019.

“Isn’t it weird / That you’ve seen me naked / We had conversations about forever / Now it’s about the weather okay,” read the first lyric.

The second note followed, “Isn’t it wild / That I know your weakness / And everybody at the party thinks / That you’re the best since sliced bread.”

“I just can’t believe / We went from strangers to lovers to / Strangers in a lifetime,” read the third revealing note. A fourth note, posted Wednesday morning, read, “Acting like we never met / Faking like we’d just forget / We were lovers.”

“Small Talk” follows her latest song, “Never Really Over” which was released at the end of May, and has already been certified Gold, with the music video surpassing 80 million views. The track marked Perry’s first new solo music since 2017.

However, the singer has recently made headlines after a nine-member jury found the songwriting team behind her 2013 hit “Dark Horse,” including the song’s co-creators Dr. Luke and Cirkut, to have copied Christian rap artist Marcus Gray’s 2008 song, “Joyful Noise.” Last Thursday, the jury decided on a grand total of $2.78 million owed for the copyright infringement.

RELATED: Katy Perry and Her ‘Dark Horse’ Collaborators Owe $2.78 Million in Copyright Suit, Jury Finds

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While the singer will responsible for a little more than $550,000, Capitol Records will pay a large portion of the amount owed to Gray.

Christopher Polk/Getty Images

Perry and her collaborators slammed the decision in a statement obtained by Variety.

“The writers of ‘Dark Horse’ view the verdicts as a travesty of justice,” the statement said. “There is no infringement. There was no access of substantial similarity. The only thing in common is unprotectable expression — evenly spaced ‘C’ and ‘B’ notes — repeated. People including musicologists from all over are expressing their dismay over this.

“We will continue to fight at all appropriate levels to rectify the injustice,” the statement concluded, indicating that Perry’s team will likely be appealing the decision.

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